Friday, June 8, 2012

Facebook Partnership With Microsoft & Nokia – If It Doesn’t Work


Source:  Wall Street Cheat

Ask Google how things are with Apple?  Well, the relationship between Apple and Google is like the US and USSR at the height of the Cold War at best.  Not long ago, the two were allies in a war against Microsoft.  Then mobile war with  iOS and Android trying to get ahead ruined everything.  Now, proxy wars are being waged and there are blogs that are dedicated to tracking them.

But this is about Facebook, the current reigning social media king.

You’d think that Google and Facebook’s competition would mean that Facebook and Apple could hook up.  That has not been the case.  In fact, Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg likely fought over how they could work together and nothing came of it.

However, last week, there is signs of that but Facebook’s main patron has always been Microsoft.  Tim Cook complimented Facebook and asked for patience on what Apple and Facebook could be working on.  

And now, this post is suggesting a potential alliance between Microsoft and Nokia be added with one more:  Facebook.

It’s a dangerous spot for Facebook to say the least if it wants to work with Nokia and push Microsoft's Windows Phone and Windows 8 over those operated by its current mobile patrons.  There are a few reasons why Facebook and Nokia could be natural partners but there is only one reason why Facebook should not go for it:  Android and iOS with its 80-90% of the mobile market.

If both Apple and Google see Facebook as a threat (and they already probably do), you can bet that Cuperino and Mountain View would make it their mission to undercut anything Facebook wants to do on their mobile platforms.  Google will obviously continue to push Google+ and its apps while Apple could promote its relations with others like Twitter and even push ahead with other app alliances.  Both Apple and Google, while battling each other, would each wage their own individual wars against Facebook, Nokia, and Microsoft.

So, that’s what it is.  Facebook risks alienating what little foothold it’s got in mobile in exchange for Windows Phone with even less market-share and an uncertain future.

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