Friday, August 3, 2012

Mobile: Some Colleges Unable To Meet Wireless Demands Despite Increasing Tuition


Source:  Mashable.

Interesting post on colleges having trouble meeting the wireless demands on their networks.  The thing with this is that those colleges without adequate wireless Internet services should be pointed out because our students need them - it's practically as important as having oxygen.


US News And World Report does an annual ranking of the best schools.  Maybe they ought to include a section for schools best able to meet the mobile and technological demands of their students.

More than 3/4 of US higher education institutions have problems meeting their students' wireless needs.  This is absolutely horrible.  And the thing is that it'll get worse quarter after quarter, sememster after semester, not just by year.

And not just with students armed with smartphones and laptops but tablets will increasing become an integral part of their learning process.  Here are some disturbing information:

  • Only 68% of schools offer unlimited connectivity.  I don't know what the other 32% are thinking by keeping its student population from downloading notes or its researchers from...well, researching.
  • Little more than 1/2 of schools can claim go have 80% of residential area covered.  
  • Only 1/3 of schools offer 500Mbps speed.  
  • 64% Of students consider moving because their Internet is slow or nonexistent.  I would.  
Here is another fact that highlights just how schools are slow in adapting to the needs of their students.  9 Of 10 schools think it'll get worse as tablets flood the campus in the coming years.  Dude, they're coming this fall, in like a few weeks.

Higher education remains one of the crown jewels in the country and students here learn to prepare and compete in an increasingly sophisticated and wired global economic system.  It's the best opportunity our future gen has to continue to do well.  And wireless tech is now a part of the process regardless of whether archaic school administrators want to face it or not.

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