Thursday, August 4, 2011

Evernote And Springpad: Both Online Notebook Services Rock; Mobile Giants Should Buy Them Out And Integrate Their Services

You know what I'm going to do if I win the lottery tomorrow?  I'll put some of that money and invest in Evernote and/or Springpad. Both are cloud-based services that allow you to sync your life - they are indesensible tools for today's mobile warriors.  Basically, a not so full-sized version of Google's webapps and certainly something that I would like to see Apple move iCloud towards. 

Both are cloud-based note-taking services that allow the user a lot of freedom move notes around, sync them, and are easily accessible on the Web or apps.  

And yes, I use both services and swear by them. And they sit squarely on the bottom doc of my iPhone and on the center home page of my Triumph. 

I use Evernote every day. I write posts and notes and sync them.  When when I'm at Starbucks, I can access the notes from my iPad or phone (or my Macbook Air)  And I can't go back to anything else because there isn't anything else like this. There simply is no webapp with desktop and cloud integration like this.   

The same thing goes for Springpad as well.  And I really like Springpad because it allows me to scan products wherever I go, find it online or locally through the barcode.  

Here's a very detailed comparison between the two services by Computerworld.  It's a recommended read if you're not familiar with the two services and want to learn more about them. Not too complicated to understand.  I'll also include their homepages and wiki links so you can check them out.  Like the author of the article, I cannot pick a winner at the moment.  I'm loving both.  

There are also premium services for Evernote you can pay for if you need more bandwidth for syncing or storage.  I don't need them right now but as my needs grow, I probably will have to shell out the money for the premium services.  And when that time comes, I'll happily do it.  

And as I've said in the title of the post, why are these two companies allowed to freely roam the cloud without something buying them up.  Naturally, Google and Microsoft both have their own services but Apple doesn't.  And I see Facebook can use something like Springpad nicely.  

Or anyone with a play in mobile and want to be able to participate in the mobile and cloud spaces.  

More info:

Note:  I'll get into some neat uses that I've seen around the Web that uses both of these services. 

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